New recipes

Double Dipped Cookie Sticks

Double Dipped Cookie Sticks

This sweet recipe is perfect for an afternoon tea party or sweet that is nice, light, and festive.

Double Dipped Cookie Sticks

This sweet recipe is perfect for an afternoon tea party or sweet that is nice, light, and festive.

Ingredients

  • 1 package premade sugar cookie dough, preferably Nestle Toll House Rolled and Ready Sugar Cookie Dough Sheets
  • 1/2 cup semi-sweet morsels, preferably Nestle Toll House Semi-Sweet Chocolate Morsels
  • 1/2 cup white morsels, preferably Nestle Toll House Premier White Morsels
  • 1 Teaspoon vegetable oil, divided
  • Decorative sprinkles

Bird’s Nest Sugar Cookies

To celebrate the coming of spring, it seemed fitting to make some Bird’s Nest Cookies. You’re going to be amazed by how simple these sweet cookies are to make. They turned out so cute, and were incredibly easy to make using ready-made ingredients. I think these would also be perfect for Easter along with this Carrot Cake Trifle.

Anyone that knows me, knows that I love birds. My yard has become a popular haven for various species, and I love to sit out on my screened porch to watch them, often with binoculars in hand. I jokingly refer to it as my ranger duties, as I go out to fill the feeders and bird baths each day. The wildlife on my property has come to rely on regular feedings and housing. It’s nearly spring, so soon it will be time to start putting out nesting materials. I’m looking forward to a yard filled with chirping babies.

Here’s are the ingredients you need for this project:

1 package Sugar Cookie Dough Sheets (from the refrigerator section of your grocery store)
green decorator icing
small candy coated eggs

I used Nestlé Toll House Rolled and Ready Cookie Dough to make the cookies, but use your favorite sugar cookie recipe if you like. The package contains 2 sheets of dough that are rolled and ready for your cookie cutters.

Simply use a round cookie cutter or the open end of a glass to cut out your cookies. Bake on baking sheets, according to package directions. Remove to a wire rack to cool completely.

Once the cookies have cooled completely, use a star tip to create a grassy nest on top of the cookies. I think a leaf tip would work fine for this too. If you don’t have any decorator tips, just swirl some on with the back of a spoon. This might be easier if you have little ones helping you. I used a prepared green decorator icing to keep this baking project super simple. You could alternately make your own buttercream icing and tint it green with food coloring.

Lastly, top each nest with a few candy coated eggs.

These bird’s nest cookies are a great way to create fun, and are sure to be a hit with your family. My little girl loved these cookies. I have a feeling we will be making a lot more of them.


Double Dipped Cookie Sticks - Recipes


I've discovered something about myself as I cook and bake more. I'm becoming more adventurous, and willing to take risks with my food. Valentine's day weekend, I was making a desert to take to a family party. It was supposed to be a strawberry jello-like dessert. I made the crust, but when I went to make the topping, I realized that I didn't have any white chocolate chips. I was tired and disappointed. A year earlier, I would have thrown in the towel and picked something up at the grocery store.

This time, however, I just stood there, staring at that crust, wondering what I could do with it. I wanted to use the strawberries, and I had the idea of cream stuck in my head. I ended up making a cream cheese frosting, and added the strawberries on top. Now, it sounded simple. Basically it was just a sugar cookie with frosting and strawberries. You can imagine that, right? But, when it came time to eat, this desert was an amazing creation. The frosting had not set up like frosting does, probably because of the strawberry juice, or because it had been out of the fridge for awhile. I was so worried when I cut into it, and the frosting was a liquid. But then I heard something. From the mouth of my Grandpa came these words. "This sauce is amazing!" Yes! My dessert was a triumph!

Crust:
1 pouch (1lb 1.5oz) Sugar Cookie Mix (I used Betty Crocker)
1/2 cup margarine or butter, softened
1 egg

Frosting:
1 cream cheese block, softened
1 stick (1/4 lb or 1/2 cup) butter, softened
4 cups Powdered Sugar
1 teas. vanilla
1 cup of pureed strawberries

Toppings:
3-4 cups additional sliced strawberries
1 cup shredded coconut

Heat oven to 350. Spray bottom only of a 13x9inch baking pan with cooking spray. In a large bowl, combine cookie mix, butter, and egg until a soft dough forms. Press evenly in bottom of pan. Bake 15-20 minutes, or until light golden brown. Cool completely- about 30 minutes.

Make frosting: Combine all the frosting ingredients, EXCEPT the strawberries in a large bowl. Mix with a hand mixer on medium, until combined and fluffy. Stir in pureed strawberries.

Layer the sliced strawberries on top of the cookie crust saving a few for garnish.

Frost the top of the cookie bar. I didn't use the entire amount of frosting- only about 3/4 of it. If you have extras, just put it in the fridge, where you can spread it on graham crackers and enjoy later!

Sprinkle the saved strawberries and the coconut on top of the frosting. Cover and refrigerate to keep the strawberries fresh.


Double-Dipping on Trial

At my office holiday party recently, a co-worker of mine dipped a chip into the guacamole, took a bite, and then dipped the chip again. I was repulsed. Then I looked around and saw lots of people were double-dipping, taking bites of carrot and celery sticks and then plunging them back into the various dips. I thought it was widely known that this is gross. If you need to dip a second time, you should at least reverse the dipped item so the unbitten side touches the dip. Am I wrong?
—Single-Dipper

People frown on double-dipping because they assume it contaminates the dip for everyone else. But does it? Professor Nancy Zeller, director of biology teaching laboratories at American University, conducted a scientific investigation into the matter. Her students double-dipped in five different dips, including salsa and spinach-artichoke. After letting the dips sit for an hour, Zeller tested a sample from each and found negligible amounts of bacteria.

She explains: “When you bite a chip, you don’t put much of your lips on that chip. You tend to bite with your teeth, so you’re not introducing much saliva, which is where the bacteria are.”

Even if the double-dipper does leave behind traces of saliva, many dips are not hospitable to bacterial growth. The dips tested in the experiment, Zeller says, were “processed dips with a lot of additives and salt, which may help to keep bacteria in check.” Rick Rodgers, author of Dip It! Great Party Food to Spread, Spoon, and Scoop, says that although homemade dips don’t have additives, they often have other ingredients that discourage bacteria, including “acidic ingredients, such as vinegar and citrus juices [and] high levels of salt.”

It’s Still Gross

So double-dipping is unlikely to give anyone hepatitis. Nevertheless, many people will have a visceral negative reaction to it. “I would be shocked if someone double-dipped,” says Rodgers. “It’s bad etiquette.” If double-dipping were allowed, then, in his view, it would be a slippery slope to cavemanlike behavior: “Why not just stick your fingers directly in the dip and not use celery at all?”

Rodgers recommends reversing your crudité or chip and dipping the unbitten side, or breaking the item into pieces and dipping each one individually. But I disagree. Even if you do follow Rodgers’s reversal rule, people might not realize you have done so and may suspect you of double-dipping anyway.

A Host’s Responsibility

If you’re hosting a party serving dip, make sure you buy smaller chips, or cut vegetables into small sizes. Cauliflower should be broken into manageable florets, and celery, cucumber, and zucchini should be sliced into batons about the size of a baby-cut carrot.

Many hosts think dips are too unhygienic to serve at parties. Rodgers, a former caterer, says: “When you talk to a caterer, they’ll say dips are a problem because of double-dipping, so they prefer to make hors d’oeuvres.” But if you’re not a team of caterers, crafting individual canapés is a lot of work. Dips are easier. More importantly, they help people connect. Many cultures have a bonding ritual that involves eating or drinking from the same vessel. In parts of South America, people might share a gourd of mate. At your holiday party, you share a tub of hummus.


Double-dipped peanut biscuits

Chocolate and peanut butter is a classic combination, and these double-dipped peanut biscuits really make the most of it. They're super easy to make and are a delicious sweet treat.

Published: September 8, 2017 at 11:21 am

Try our easy peanut butter cookies recipe. Chocolate and peanut butter is a classic combo, so we’ve created the best peanut butter cookies with extra chocolate. Here are our favourite peanut butter recipes if you want more ideas…

Ingredients

  • golden caster sugar 110g
  • crunchy peanut butter 250g
  • egg 1
  • white chocolate 100g, chopped
  • dark chocolate 100g, chopped

Method

Heat the oven to 170C/fan 150C/gas 3. Mix the sugar with the peanut butter and egg until it is thoroughly combined. Divide the mixture into 24 even balls. Line a couple of baking sheets with non-stick baking paper and put the balls on about 5 cm apart. Press them down gently to uniform thickness. Bake for 35 minutes, or until lightly golden, don’t over bake them or they’ll get too hard. Cool completely.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup butter, softened
  • 1 cup confectioners' sugar
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 cup oatmeal
  • 1 cup chopped pecans
  • 1 tablespoon confectioners' sugar, or as needed

Preheat an oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C). Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

In a bowl, mix the flour, baking soda, and salt. In a separate large bowl, mix the butter, 1 cup confectioners' sugar, and vanilla until the mixture is smooth and creamy. Stir in the flour mixture gently stir in the oatmeal and pecans and lightly mix until combined.

With a spoon, drop about 1 scant tablespoon of dough per cookie onto the prepared baking sheet. Bake in the preheated oven until lightly browned, about 20 minutes. Let cool completely before sprinkling cookies with confectioners' sugar.


WHAT ARE BISCOTTI?

What are biscotti? I’m so glad you asked! In a nutshell… Biscotti are twice-baked Italian cookies!

To begin, you make the cookie dough. It traditionally consists of flour, eggs, sugar, and almonds — a fairly simple ingredients list! — yet American versions often include butter, oil, and sometimes milk or cream.

For the first bake, you shape the cookie dough into a long and skinny rectangle, about ¾” tall. That goes in the oven for about half an hour, or until the outside feels crisp and firm.

After a few minutes of cooling — just long enough so you don’t burn your fingers! — you slice that rectangle into strips. The strips can either be straight across or at a slight diagonal, but then you put those strips (your individual cookies!) back in the oven to continue baking until they’re completely crisp and crunchy.


Because of this twice-baked method that normally leaves them dry and hard, biscotti are usually more shelf-stable and will keep much longer than other types of cookies. (This is why people often dunk them in coffee or tea… The hot liquid softens the cookies so they’re easier to bite into!)

Hint: If you’re a nerd like me and want to learn more about the history of biscotti, then I’ve covered that over here with my ultimate healthy biscotti recipe!


Double-Dipping on Trial

At my office holiday party recently, a co-worker of mine dipped a chip into the guacamole, took a bite, and then dipped the chip again. I was repulsed. Then I looked around and saw lots of people were double-dipping, taking bites of carrot and celery sticks and then plunging them back into the various dips. I thought it was widely known that this is gross. If you need to dip a second time, you should at least reverse the dipped item so the unbitten side touches the dip. Am I wrong?
—Single-Dipper

People frown on double-dipping because they assume it contaminates the dip for everyone else. But does it? Professor Nancy Zeller, director of biology teaching laboratories at American University, conducted a scientific investigation into the matter. Her students double-dipped in five different dips, including salsa and spinach-artichoke. After letting the dips sit for an hour, Zeller tested a sample from each and found negligible amounts of bacteria.

She explains: “When you bite a chip, you don’t put much of your lips on that chip. You tend to bite with your teeth, so you’re not introducing much saliva, which is where the bacteria are.”

Even if the double-dipper does leave behind traces of saliva, many dips are not hospitable to bacterial growth. The dips tested in the experiment, Zeller says, were “processed dips with a lot of additives and salt, which may help to keep bacteria in check.” Rick Rodgers, author of Dip It! Great Party Food to Spread, Spoon, and Scoop, says that although homemade dips don’t have additives, they often have other ingredients that discourage bacteria, including “acidic ingredients, such as vinegar and citrus juices [and] high levels of salt.”

It’s Still Gross

So double-dipping is unlikely to give anyone hepatitis. Nevertheless, many people will have a visceral negative reaction to it. “I would be shocked if someone double-dipped,” says Rodgers. “It’s bad etiquette.” If double-dipping were allowed, then, in his view, it would be a slippery slope to cavemanlike behavior: “Why not just stick your fingers directly in the dip and not use celery at all?”

Rodgers recommends reversing your crudité or chip and dipping the unbitten side, or breaking the item into pieces and dipping each one individually. But I disagree. Even if you do follow Rodgers’s reversal rule, people might not realize you have done so and may suspect you of double-dipping anyway.

A Host’s Responsibility

If you’re hosting a party serving dip, make sure you buy smaller chips, or cut vegetables into small sizes. Cauliflower should be broken into manageable florets, and celery, cucumber, and zucchini should be sliced into batons about the size of a baby-cut carrot.

Many hosts think dips are too unhygienic to serve at parties. Rodgers, a former caterer, says: “When you talk to a caterer, they’ll say dips are a problem because of double-dipping, so they prefer to make hors d’oeuvres.” But if you’re not a team of caterers, crafting individual canapés is a lot of work. Dips are easier. More importantly, they help people connect. Many cultures have a bonding ritual that involves eating or drinking from the same vessel. In parts of South America, people might share a gourd of mate. At your holiday party, you share a tub of hummus.


Recipe Summary

  • 6 ounces semisweet chocolate squares or pieces
  • 2 tablespoons shortening
  • 12 graham cracker squares, halved
  • 6 ounces white chocolate baking squares with cocoa butter or white baking pieces
  • Small white candies
  • Miniature semisweet chocolate pieces

In a microwave-safe 2-cup glass measure, place the 6 ounces semisweet chocolate and 1 tablespoon shortening. Microwave chocolate mixture on 100 percent power (high) for 1-1/2 to 2 minutes or just until melted, stirring every 30 seconds.

Dip half of each halved cracker in the melted chocolate use a small spatula to smooth out chocolate, if necessary. Place cracker on a cookie sheet lined with parchment or waxed paper. If desired, while chocolate is still soft, lightly press small white candies into chocolate to resemble dots on dominoes. Chill crackers for 10 minutes or until set.

In another microwave-safe 2-cup glass measure, place the white chocolate and remaining 1 tablespoon shortening. Microwave chocolate mixture on 100 percent power (high) for 1-1/2 to 2 minutes or just until melted, stirring every 30 seconds.

Dip plain half of each cracker in melted white chocolate. Place on a cookie sheet lined with parchment or waxed paper. If desired, while chocolate is still soft, press miniature semisweet chocolate pieces into white chocolate to resemble dots on dominoes. Let crackers stand until set. Makes 24 cookies.

Layer crackers between waxed paper in an airtight container cover. Store at room temperature for up to 3 days or freeze for up to 1 month.


Line a baking sheet with waxed paper or parchment paper, and set aside for now.

Place the chocolate candy coating in a medium microwave-safe bowl. Microwave in 30-second increments, stirring after every 30 seconds to prevent overheating until the coating is melted and smooth.

Using forks or dipping tools, dip a cookie in the chocolate coating until it's coated completely. Remove it from the coating and let the excess drip back into the bowl, then place it onto a baking sheet lined with parchment or waxed paper. Repeat until all of the cookies are dipped.

Melt the white chocolate chips in the microwave, and transfer the melted chocolate to a paper cone or a plastic bag with the tip snipped off.

Drizzle the white chocolate in thin lines over the dipped cookies. Alternately, you can sprinkle the cookies with chopped nuts, coconut, small candies, or sprinkles while the chocolate is still wet.

Refrigerate the tray to let the chocolate set completely, for about 15 to 20 minutes. Store these chocolate-dipped Oreos in an airtight container at room temperature for up to two weeks.


Watch the video: ΕΎΚΟΛΗ ΝΌΣΤΙΜΑ ΜΠΑΣΤΟΎΝΙΑ! Μια συνταγή που κληρονομήθηκε! ΑΠΊΣΤΕΥΤΑ ΝΌΣΤΙΜΑ ΜΠΙΣΚΌΤΑ ΣΕ ΚΕΦΊΡ. (January 2022).